Candid Camera: Shark Gulps Another Shark Whole!

VIA – LIVE SCIENCE

 

Candid Camera: Shark Gulps Another Shark Whole

 

Jeanna Bryner, LiveScience Managing Editor
Date: 15 February 2012 Time: 09:35 AM ET
Researchers spotted a tasseled wobbegong shark consuming headfirst a somewhat smaller brown-banded bamboo shark on the southern Great Barrier Reef on Aug. 1, 2011.
CREDIT: Tom Manneri

The photo says it all: an alien-looking shark, adorned with mossy hairs and a flat face, with its mouth agape and a slender bamboo shark headfirst inside. Though not unusual for a shark to snack on another shark, it’s not typical behavior — and it’s certainly not common for humans to catch the action firsthand.

In fact, the researchers who came upon the shark-eat-shark scene on the fringes of Great Keppel Island on the southern Great Barrier Reef didn’t realize at first what they were looking at.
“The white bamboo shark appeared first, and as we came closer, we suddenly realized that its head was not hidden under a ledge…
For the full article go here:

The photo says it all: an alien-looking shark, adorned with mossy hairs and a flat face, with its mouth agape and a slender bamboo shark headfirst inside. Though not unusual for a shark to snack on another shark, it’s not typical behavior — and it’s certainly not common for humans to catch the action firsthand.

In fact, the researchers who came upon the shark-eat-shark scene on the fringes of Great Keppel Island on the southern Great Barrier Reef didn’t realize at first what they were looking at.
“The white bamboo shark appeared first, and as we came closer, we suddenly realized that its head was not hidden under a ledge
http://www.livescience.com/18486-wobbegong-shark-eats-bamboo-shark.html

The photo says it all: an alien-looking shark, adorned with mossy hairs and a flat face, with its mouth agape and a slender bamboo shark headfirst inside. Though not unusual for a shark to snack on another shark, it’s not typical behavior — and it’s certainly not common for humans to catch the action firsthand.

In fact, the researchers who came upon the shark-eat-shark scene on the fringes of Great Keppel Island on the southern Great Barrier Reef didn’t realize at first what they were looking at.

“The white bamboo shark appeared first, and as we came closer, we suddenly realized that its head was not hidden under a ledge…

The photo says it all: an alien-looking shark, adorned with mossy hairs and a flat face, with its mouth agape and a slender bamboo shark headfirst inside. Though not unusual for a shark to snack on another shark, it’s not typical behavior — and it’s certainly not common for humans to catch the action firsthand.

In fact, the researchers who came upon the shark-eat-shark scene on the fringes of Great Keppel Island on the southern Great Barrier Reef didn’t realize at first what they were looking at.

“The white bamboo shark appeared first, and as we came closer, we suddenly realized that its head was not hidden under a ledge
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